Top down cardigan

I am very proud of this jumper as it took at least three attempts and on and off 2.5 years to make but it was all worth it because this is the first me-made jumper I will actually wear. Oh and I designed it myself using the top-down method. 


For those of you who don’t know top-down knitting is about knitting a jumper in the round from the neck downwards. As it is knitted from the top-down you can keep trying the jumper on so you can create your own pattern that fits perfectly. I learnt this technique by attending Jill‘s top-down class at Fabrications.  My latest attempt was encouraged by Fringe Association’s top-down knitalong.


I used 16 balls of navy blue bulky weight wool from the Daiso in Harajuku, Tokyo and mainly 5mm circular needles with 4mm for the ribs. The buttons are from a sale at John Lewis last year.


How I calculated the pattern

I began by measuring myself and my pre-existing jumpers to decide what measurements I wanted my jumper to have. I then knitted a swatch using my wool and measured how many stitches and rows were in an inch of my swatch. I used these to work out how many stitches to cast on and the number of stitches I was aiming for. To work out the rate of increase I deducted the number of stitches cast on from the number of stitches I was ending on and then divided this by the number of rows that were going to be in the yoke.


Specifics of this pattern

1. Cast on 56 stitches separated by stitch markers at the following points 1, 10, 34, 10, 1.

2. Yoke increases (do these simultaneously)

  • Neck increases: 8 x every 4th row then 8 x every 2nd row. These are the knitted in the first and last stitches of the row.
  • Front and back raglan increases: 20 x every 2nd row then 3 x every 4th row. These are knitted in the stitches before the first and third markers and after the second and fourth markers.
  • Sleeve raglan increases: 8 x every 2nd row then 9x every 4th row. These are knitted in the stitches after the first and third markers and before the second and fourth markers.

3. Body

  • Cast on 6 stitches at each underarm.
  • Decrease  2 stiches every  10th row twice  (one at each end) using k2tog and ssk two stitches in from the start and end.
  • Continue with no decreases until it is the desired length.
  • For the rib do 2 inches of k1p1 rib.

Note: For this jumper I didn’t have loads of wool and I wanted to ensure I had full length sleeves so after knitting a few rows of the body I knitted the full sleeves before returning to knit the rest of the body.

4. Sleeves

  • Pick up 6 stitches from the body stitches.

Note: To avoid holes pick up more stitches and knit them together on the next row to end up with only six extra stitches.

  • Knit flat.
  • Every 10 rows decrease 2 stitches seven times (one at each end) using k2tog and ssk two stitches in from the start and end.
  • For the cuffs do 2 inches of k1p1 rib.

5. Button band

Note: For this cardigan I knit the button band separately and attached it to the cardigan as you go along.

  • Cast on 5 stitches of k1p1 rib ending on a knit stitch.
  • Create button holes by doing yo every 8 rows.

I sewed up the sleeve seams and the button band using mattress stitch which looks a lot more professional as everything lies flat.

I love love love this cardigan and it’s cropped length, I feel very trendy in a ‘I don’t care about fashion’ way.

Oh and this is another item done from my #2017makenine

 

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